ANIMATION

SUPPLY LIST FOR ANIMATION

 

 

Three main things will be considered when evaluating a student’s design work:

 

Effort - visible in the work and/or demonstrated in class; spend quality time on your work!

Creativity - how original your work is

Following Directions - did you explore the assignment as given?

• Drawing Sketch Pad

• 1 Subject Notebook

• 2-inch 3-ring binder

• 8GB Flash Drive

• Drawing Pencils

• Eraser

• Pencil Sharpener

• Fine Tip Sharpie

Class Syllabus|Rules

5th 6 Weeks

Technology Use

 

Students should have all devices on silent mode and put away when I am teaching. If you are doing independent work you may listen to music with one ear-bud in your ear.

 

GRADING POLICY

 

Student grades for this course will be calculated according to the following percentages:

  • 50% Major projects
  • 50% Small Projects / Practice Assignments
  • On time maximum credit: 100%
  • Late work maximum credit: 70% (10 points off per day late)

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

 

As a result of taking this class, you should be able to:

Utilize the tools of design, presentation, and animation.

Practice the creative and technical process of animation.

Develop systems of creative thinking that will aid in solving visual problems.

Explore how how ideas are generated in animation and how problems are resolved.

Understand and define successful animation.

Build an animation gradually using sketches and mockups.

Create model sheets.

Write storyboards

 

In addition to the comprehensive objectives, you should be able to:

Use Adobe Illustrator to create character drawings and an illustrated story.

Use Adobe Flash to create various types of animations.

Integrate the use of Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Flash together to create various types of animations.

Use Adobe Edge Animate to create interactive animations.

Use AutoDesk Maya and Mudbox to create and animate 3D characters.

 

How Do I Make Up Missing or Incomplete Work?

You are expected to keep up with lessons and projects in class. Keep track of course assignments and due dates at this website. Late or incomplete work can be turned in during the same six weeks for a reduced score of 10 points per day. If the work is late due to an excused absence, you will have one extra school day per day of excused absence to complete it without a reduction in grade.

Please let me know as soon as you have submitted a late assignment. Otherwise I will not know to look for it.

 

Open Lab - the lab is open at 8:00 am every morning for students to come in and work.

 

Design Room Rules

Refer to the Student Handbook for school-wide rules. We have design room rules too:

1. Don’t prevent me from teaching.

2. Don’t prevent others from learning.

3. Be safe.

4. Keep things clean.

 

What Do those 4 Rules Really Mean Day-to-Day?

Here are some examples to show you what I mean. These are examples. Use your common sense when interpreting these rules.

Don’t prevent me from teaching.

• Don’t speak while I am instructing the class.

• Raise your hand if you wish to speak, and wait for me to call on you.

• Don’t interrupt when I am giving personal attention to another student.

Don’t prevent others from learning.

• Don’t behave in a disruptive or distracting way.

• Don’t engage in lengthy off-topic conversations.

• Keep the volume of your voice down.

• No singing, rapping, or other disruptive noises.

Be safe.

• Don’t throw, toss, flick, or roll anything across the table, floor, or classroom.

• Don’t roll across the classroom in your chair.

• Use classroom materials in a safe manner.

• Don’t behave in any way that threatens harm to anyone or our equipment.

Keep things clean.

• Clean up after yourself so your station is ready for the next student.

• Return classroom materials to the proper storage place.

• Don’t eat messy things that can leave residue on the computers.

• Keep your language clean.

Professional Skills Grade

It is my job to help you develop positive work behaviors and personal qualities needed to be employable by demonstrating skills related to seeking employment , creating work samples and earning certifications. Each week you will earn a "professional skills grade" for your professional conduct in class by following the Design Room Rules and following the 4 Rules detailed above.

  • 1st 6 Weeks - February 27 - March 3

    This week we are going to "mimic" a story test to get hired at an animation studio. From Matt Jones blog we see the test he took to get hired with Dreamworks Animation. Click on the book outline to open.

     

     

    The following article was taken from www.the-flying-animator.com, by Netta Canfi

     

    What is a Storyboard?

    The role of the storyboard in a TV or movie production

     

    A storyboard is a plan, a way of figuring out the story of the film before you put in the enormous amount of work of the animation itself. Basically, it is the story of the movie drawn in pictures, very much like a comic strip.

     

    Storyboard example: Numbers Around the Globe, BF-TV Channel. Story artist: Fernando Yache

     

    From a storytelling point of view, a storyboard for film or TV needs to answer two questions:

     

    • What is happening?
    • What is the best way to SHOW IT?

     

    The Storyboard as a Production Tool

     

    What you need to consider when drawing a storyboard, is who is going to use it, and how.

     

    This piece of paper is a working document. It passes many hands during production, and each professional will need to understand different things from it.

    Let's see just what is a storyboard for each person in the production:

     

    The Director

     

    First of all, the director sits with the story-artiste to figure out the story itself, and the cinematic language.

     

    They take the script and turn it into visual sequences. Attached to each pane you'll usually find a description of the camera (close-up, long shot, pan left, ect.,), the relevant piece of dialogue, and sometimes a verbal description of the action in the scene.

    A storyboard alone is hard to time . A very likely next step is to put the panes on a timeline and turn them into a videoboard ("animatique"), with a guide soundtrack. I'll discuss videoboards in another article, though, let's just stick to paper here.

     

    Once the director manages to show and tell the story on paper, the storyboard starts traveling thru the production pipeline:

     

    Designers

     

    Designers break it down to which characters they need to design, and make a list of props, backgrounds and anything else that needs to be drawn or modeled.

     

    Opener for TV series "StoryTime", for the Hop! Channel. Story artist: Netta Canfi

     

    From this storyboard we learn that we need to design:

     

    Characters:

    • girl
    • dad
    • close-up of dad's hand (This sort of thing is very important! A body part shown in close-up is usually a different rig or design in animation.)

    Props:

    • a book
    • the same book- open
    • the book - close up with the show's logo  (title) on it

     

    Backgrounds:

    • library
    • street
    • bedroom

     

    More professionals in the production will make similar lists, according to what the storyboard means for them:

     

    Technical Directors (TD)

     

    In a computer animation production, the riggers look at the boards and analyze what the characters have to DO, how they need to MOVE.

     

    For example, they might realize that they need to build a different rig for a particular sequence, or discover that a major character has LONG HAIR!

     

    Special Effects Crews

     

    Storyboards started in the animation world but were quickly adopted by live-action productions, especially when complicated special effects came on the scene.

    In this TV commercial, the special effects people studied the storyboard to see if they need a wind machine, a blue screen, or a wire to hang the cheese from...

     

    TV commercial storyboard. Story artist: Netta Canfi

     

    Soundtrack Designers

     

    The soundtrack designers look at the story panes and figure out which sounds they need to record. For example, if the storyboard shows a character walking, they make a note to record the sound of footsteps.

     

    The list goes on and on -

     

    Producers (they take everybody else's lists and use them to estimate the budget), photographers, costume designers, set builders, and of course the animators themselves - all use the storyboard, together with the script, as the blueprint of the film.

     

    Each will glean different information from the same piece of paper.

     

    Types of Storyboards

     

    There are as many types of storyboards as there are aspects of production.

    You could come across:

     

    1. A rough jotted down storyboard that just tries to figure out the story.
    2. Concept storyboards, rich in color and detail, that search for the atmosphere of the film.
    3. Color storyboards that map out the entire film according to which colors dominate which sequence.
    4. Animation storyboards, that can be as detailed as keyframes of the animation itself.
    5. Presentation storyboards, very elaborate and finely drawn, designed to sell an idea to a client.

     

    Concept illustration - "Buba Yemima" ( the doll Yemima) for the Hop! Channel. Illustrator: Netta Canfi

     

    Which brings us to an important point you must remember:

    You really cannot show it just to anyone.

     

    What does this storyboard mean?

     

    Most types of boards are a kind of short hand: you need to be able to understand what you "read".

    You yourself may perfectly understand the few lines and squiggles you jotted down to plan a piece of animation, but someone else might not have the first clue as how to look at it.

     

    Many storyboard meetings take place with the director or story artists playing and explaining the pictures to the production team. More often than not, a storyboard needs some background explanations and can't stand by itself.

     

    Also, when dealing with a client who is perhaps paying for the animation, but has never made a film - remember that people may not be able to imagine how a sequence drawn on paper will look like on the screen at the end.

     

    My rule of thumb:

     

    The more people need to use the storyboard - the more elaborate and communicative it needs to be.

    If it's a quick sketch you made for yourself alone - just make sure YOU will be able to understand it a week after you've drawn it.

    If it's for many other people to use - make it as communicative as possible, even print the text under the panes to make sure it's readable. Remember that you won't be in the room to explain what you meant!

     

    The Assignment

     

    Each student will receive pages from the WALL-E Screenplay by Andrew Stanton and Jim Reardon. You will complete the following steps on your portion of the screenplay.

     

    1. Create quick sketches on your pages of the script.
    2. Create a thumbnail storyboard for your pages. (#1 under Types of Storyboards - see above)
    3. Create a 4x3 storyboard for your pages. (#2 under Types of Storyboards - see above)
  • 2nd 6 Weeks - March 6 - March 10

    Complete final Storyboard:

    • Create a 4x3 storyboard for your pages. (#2 under Types of Storyboards - see 1st 6 weeks)
    • Use drawing paper and draw your squares.
    • This storyboard is more detailed in the drawing of each frame but it covers more "time" than the thumbnail sketches you completed last week.
    • Review - Matt Jones Storyboard Test - in the assignments for examples.
    • Due Friday before we leave for spring break

     

  • 3rd 6 Weeks - March 20 - March 24

    Begin Learning Toon Boom Storyboard Pro

     

    Create a Free account at ToonBoom using your personal email account. 
    https://learn.toonboom.com/

     

    POINTS WILL BE DEDUCTED FOR ASSIGNMENTS NOT TURNED IN WITHIN 1 DAY OF THE DUE DATE!!!!

     

    ASSIGNMENT #1 (1 hour 32 minutes) - Due by Friday, March 24th

    Complete Storyboard Concepts: What is a Shot or Scene?

    Storyboard Concepts: Learn how to use Storyboard Pro to create storyboards complete with camera moves, animation and sound.

    Once you have created your account click here https://learn.toonboom.com/modules/storyboard-concepts to start reviewing storyboard concepts.

    Use your storyboard for your portion of Wall:E for Activity 1: Your First Storyboard

    • does your storyboard meet the criteria covered in this lesson?

     

    ASSIGNMENT #2 (1 hour 45 minutes) -  - Due by Monday, March 27th

    Project Creation: Learn about projects and how to create and optimize them.

    Complete Storyboard Concepts: Project Creation - https://learn.toonboom.com/modules/project-creation

     

    ASSIGNMENT #3 (3 hours 50 minutes) - Due by Friday, March 31st

    Drawing and Colour: Learn about the drawing tools and how to draw and edit shapes.

    https://learn.toonboom.com/modules/drawing-and-colour

     

    You will work thru all of the steps and need to turn in the following:

    • Activity 1: Drawing Scenes
    • Activity 2: Generating an Auto-Matte

     

     

  • 4th 6 Weeks - March 27 - March 31

    Toon Boom - Storyboard Pro

     

    POINTS WILL BE DEDUCTED FOR ASSIGNMENTS NOT TURNED IN WITHIN 1 DAY OF THE DUE DATE!!!!

     

    ASSIGNMENT #2 (1 hour 45 minutes) -  - Due by Monday, March 27th

    Project Creation: Learn about projects and how to create and optimize them.

    Complete Storyboard Concepts: Project Creation - https://learn.toonboom.com/modules/project-creation

     

    ASSIGNMENT #3 (3 hours 50 minutes) - Due by Friday, March 31st

    Drawing and Colour: Learn about the drawing tools and how to draw and edit shapes.

    https://learn.toonboom.com/modules/drawing-and-colour

     

    You will work thru all of the steps and need to turn in the following to the TurnIn Folder:

    • Activity 1: Drawing Scenes (You will need to start a new project (name your file LastnameF_RocketRodeo) and import the script found in the assignments folder. Click here for instructions on How to Import a Script and Add Captions.)
    • Activity 2: Generating an Auto-Matte (There is a start file for this assignment, add your LastnameF to the beginning of file name before turning in the assignment.)

     

     

    ASSIGNMENT #4  (4 hours 15 minutes) - Due by Friday, April 7th

    Animatic - Learn how to create an animatic with camera moves, animation and sound.

    https://learn.toonboom.com/modules/animatic

     

    You will work thru all of the steps and need to turn in the following: (There is a start file for this assignment, add your LastnameF to the beginning of file name before turning in the assignment.)

    • Activity 1: Creating the Animatic
    • Activity 2: Animating Layers
    • Activity 3: Adding Sound
    • Activity 4: Adding Scene Markers
    • Activity 5: Flipping a Scene

     

  • 5th 6 Weeks - April 3 - April 7

    Toon Boom - Storyboard Pro

     

    POINTS WILL BE DEDUCTED FOR ASSIGNMENTS NOT TURNED IN WITHIN 1 DAY OF THE DUE DATE!!!!

     

    ASSIGNMENT #4  (4 hours 15 minutes) - Due by Friday, April 7th

    Animatic - Learn how to create an animatic with camera moves, animation and sound.

    https://learn.toonboom.com/modules/animatic

     

    You will work thru all of the steps and need to turn in the following:

    • Activity 1: Creating the Animatic
    • Activity 2: Animating Layers
    • Activity 3: Adding Sound
    • Activity 4: Adding Scene Markers
    • Activity 5: Flipping a Scene

     

  • 6th 6 Weeks - April 10 - April 13 (short week)

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