ANIMATION

Three main things will be considered when evaluating a student’s design work:

 

Effort - visible in the work and/or demonstrated in class; spend quality time on your work!

Creativity - how original your work is

Following Directions - did you explore the assignment as given?

SUPPLY LIST FOR ANIMATION

 

 

• Drawing Sketch Pad

• 1 Subject Notebook

• 2-inch 3-ring binder

• 8GB Flash Drive

• Drawing Pencils

• Eraser

• Pencil Sharpener

• Fine Tip Sharpie

Class Syllabus|Rules

1st 6 Weeks

Technology Use

 

Students should have all devices on silent mode and put away when I am teaching. If you are doing independent work you may listen to music with one ear-bud in your ear.

 

GRADING POLICY

 

Student grades for this course will be calculated according to the following percentages:

  • 50% Major projects
  • 50% Small Projects / Practice Assignments
  • On time maximum credit: 100%
  • Late work maximum credit: 70% (10 points off per day late)

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

 

As a result of taking this class, you should be able to:

Utilize the tools of design, presentation, and animation.

Practice the creative and technical process of animation.

Develop systems of creative thinking that will aid in solving visual problems.

Explore how how ideas are generated in animation and how problems are resolved.

Understand and define successful animation.

Build an animation gradually using sketches and mockups.

Create model sheets.

Write storyboards

 

In addition to the comprehensive objectives, you should be able to:

Use Adobe Illustrator to create character drawings and an illustrated story.

Use Adobe Flash to create various types of animations.

Integrate the use of Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Flash together to create various types of animations.

Use Adobe Edge Animate to create interactive animations.

Use AutoDesk Maya and Mudbox to create and animate 3D characters.

 

How Do I Make Up Missing or Incomplete Work?

You are expected to keep up with lessons and projects in class. Keep track of course assignments and due dates at this website. Late or incomplete work can be turned in during the same six weeks for a reduced score of 10 points per day. If the work is late due to an excused absence, you will have one extra school day per day of excused absence to complete it without a reduction in grade.

Please let me know as soon as you have submitted a late assignment. Otherwise I will not know to look for it.

 

Open Lab - the lab is open at 8:00 am every morning for students to come in and work.

 

Design Room Rules

Refer to the Student Handbook for school-wide rules. We have design room rules too:

1. Don’t prevent me from teaching.

2. Don’t prevent others from learning.

3. Be safe.

4. Keep things clean.

 

What Do those 4 Rules Really Mean Day-to-Day?

Here are some examples to show you what I mean. These are examples. Use your common sense when interpreting these rules.

Don’t prevent me from teaching.

• Don’t speak while I am instructing the class.

• Raise your hand if you wish to speak, and wait for me to call on you.

• Don’t interrupt when I am giving personal attention to another student.

Don’t prevent others from learning.

• Don’t behave in a disruptive or distracting way.

• Don’t engage in lengthy off-topic conversations.

• Keep the volume of your voice down.

• No singing, rapping, or other disruptive noises.

Be safe.

• Don’t throw, toss, flick, or roll anything across the table, floor, or classroom.

• Don’t roll across the classroom in your chair.

• Use classroom materials in a safe manner.

• Don’t behave in any way that threatens harm to anyone or our equipment.

Keep things clean.

• Clean up after yourself so your station is ready for the next student.

• Return classroom materials to the proper storage place.

• Don’t eat messy things that can leave residue on the computers.

• Keep your language clean.

Professional Skills Grade

It is my job to help you develop positive work behaviors and personal qualities needed to be employable by demonstrating skills related to seeking employment , creating work samples and earning certifications. Each week you will earn a "professional skills grade" for your professional conduct in class by following the Design Room Rules and following the 4 Rules detailed above.

Week 1 - August 28 - September 1

Monday

  • Complete the "Who Am I" assignment, be sure to include a picture.
  • Click on Tools --> Add Text to type your information
  • Press F4 on your keyboard and open Photo Booth to take your picture.
  • To put your picture in your document Tools --> Add Image --> Photos --> select your image
  • You can use the crop tool to crop your image, press RETURN when you are done.
  • Print your document to "B122-Dell3130-Color", staple and turn into the tray.

NOTE: if we can not log on to the computers you will do this on paper and add you picture later.

 

Please take your time and answer the following questions. Be sure to put a page header on your paper BEFORE printing.

NOTE: if we can not log on to the computers you will do this on paper

  • Name
  • ID #
  • Class Period
  • Assignment Name: Background Info

  1. Why did you sign up for this class?
  2. What do you think this class is about?
  3. What are you hoping to learn in this class?
  4. What skills do you have already that you think will help you with this class?

 

Tuesday - Cool Careers: Animation

 

Students will research career areas in animation and then will research the job/field of their choice & create an Adobe Spark over the information and present their research to the class.

The report will cover:

  • specific job description and qualifications, expected skill set, expected technical knowledge, necessary training,
  • the educational background needed (educational needs, cost, time (how long will the degree take), school options (where the programs are offered)(best schools for that program), loans)
  • certification/exams needed
  • experience needed

 

NOTE: You may collect websites containing specific job-related information and, if appropriate, link to them within their portfolios.

 

Career areas include (you are not limited to this list in your research):

  • 3D Modeler
  • Animator
  • Art Director
  • Flash Animator
  • Stop Motion Animator
  • Video Game Designer
  • Animation Director
  • Background Painter
  • Cartoonist
  • Character Animator
  • Character Rigger
  • Color Key Artist
  • Compositing Artist
  • Concept Artist
  • Digital Painter
  • Director
  • Effects Animator
  • Forensic Animator
  • Inbetweener
  • Key Animator
  • Render Wrangler
  • Storyboard Artist
  • Texture Artist
  • Visual Development Artist

 

Presentations will be on Tuesday, September 5th.

 

Tuesday thru Friday, August 26th - Continue Research

 

Students will research career areas in design and/or print production and then will research the job/field of their choice & create an Adobe Spark over the information and present their research to the class.

The report will cover:

  • specific job description and qualifications, expected skill set, expected technical knowledge, necessary training,
  • the educational background needed (educational needs, cost, time (how long will the degree take), school options (where the programs are offered)(best schools for that program), loans)
  • certification/exams needed
  • experience needed

 

NOTE: You may collect websites containing specific job-related information and, if appropriate, link to them within their portfolios.

 

Career areas include (you are not limited to this list in your research):

 

  • 3D Modeler
  • Animator
  • Art Director
  • Flash Animator
  • Stop Motion Animator
  • Video Game Designer
  • Animation Director
  • Background Painter
  • Cartoonist
  • Character Animator
  • Character Rigger
  • Color Key Artist
  • Compositing Artist
  • Concept Artist
  • Digital Painter
  • Director
  • Effects Animator
  • Forensic Animator
  • Inbetweener
  • Key Animator
  • Render Wrangler
  • Storyboard Artist
  • Texture Artist
  • Visual Development Artist

 

Presentations will be on Tuesday, September 5th. If you have not completed your Spark presentation you will need to finish it over the weekend.

 

Share your project and send me a link to your project debra.keller@nisd.net

 

 

Week 2 - September 5 - September 8

Monday - Career Presentations

Students will begin presenting their Adobe Spark presentations on a career in the field of graphic design.

 

Tuesday thru Friday- History of Animation

Create an account on ToonBoom using your personal email address.

 

History of Animation

Learn about animation history and how it evolved to today's digital animation.

 

  1. History of Animation
  2. Persistence of Vision
  3. Optical Toys
  4. Key Events and Inventions
  5. Activity 1: Build a Thaumatrope - this should be colored and have detail.

 

You will need to call me over and show me when you have green check marks next to each of the activities.

 

You will now work on creating a zoetrope. You will be drawing 12 frames of movement. You will need to trace over your image with dark ink or a thin sharpie have you have drawn it in pencil and are happy with it.

 

The zoetrope (pronounced ZOH-uh-trohp), invented in 1834 by William George Horner, was an early form of motion picture projector that consisted of a drum containing a set of still images, that was turned in a circular fashion in order to create the illusion of motion. Horner originally called it the Daedatelum, but Pierre Desvignes, a French inventor, renamed his version of it the zoetrope (from Greek word root zoo for animal life and trope for "things that turn.")

 

A zoetrope is relatively easy to build. It can be turned at a variable rate to create slow-motion or speeded-up effects. Like other motion simulation devices, the zoetrope depends on the fact that the human retina retains an image for about a tenth-of-a-second so that if a new image appears in that time, the sequence was seem to be uninterrupted and continuous. It also depends on what is referred to as the Phi phenomenon, which observes that we try to make sense out of any sequence of impressions, continuously relating them to each other.

Week 3 - September 11 - September 15

Monday - Continue working on Zoetropes

  • You will complete 2 zoetropes. Your first can be basic to get the technique down, your second needs to be more advanced then your first.
  • Consider drawing an animal in motion for your second zoetrope.
  • Be sure to ink over the drawings after you have tested your animation so that it is easier to see.
  • Due Wednesday, September 13th

 

 

You will now work on creating a zoetrope. You will be drawing 12 frames of movement. You will need to trace over your image with dark ink or a thin sharpie have you have drawn it in pencil and are happy with it.

 

The zoetrope (pronounced ZOH-uh-trohp), invented in 1834 by William George Horner, was an early form of motion picture projector that consisted of a drum containing a set of still images, that was turned in a circular fashion in order to create the illusion of motion. Horner originally called it the Daedatelum, but Pierre Desvignes, a French inventor, renamed his version of it the zoetrope (from Greek word root zoo for animal life and trope for "things that turn.")

 

A zoetrope is relatively easy to build. It can be turned at a variable rate to create slow-motion or speeded-up effects. Like other motion simulation devices, the zoetrope depends on the fact that the human retina retains an image for about a tenth-of-a-second so that if a new image appears in that time, the sequence was seem to be uninterrupted and continuous. It also depends on what is referred to as the Phi phenomenon, which observes that we try to make sense out of any sequence of impressions, continuously relating them to each other.

Week 4 - September 18 - September 22

Character Development

 

This week you will begin learning about character development, the basis of any good quality animation. You will begin by analyzing some characters in two different animations. You will analyze the character for visual elements that define the character.

 

Click on the left for some character design tips.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this project, you will design a character of your choice.  You may create your character for an existing TV show or movie or create a character for a new TV show or movie.

Step 1 - Decide on your character

Due Monday, September 18

Option 1: Create a New Character for an Existing TV Show or Movie

Choose an animated TV show or movie that you are familiar with. Develop a character that belongs in that world. Write a three- or four-sentence description of an episode of the TV show that your character plays a role in or describe the role your character plays in a sequel to the movie you’ve chosen.

Here’s a sample description: “This episode of The Simpsons introduces a new character: Bart and Lisa’s long-lost cousin, Steve. When Bart and Lisa first meet Steve, he seems polite and reserved. Bart makes fun of Steve for being prim and proper. But Bart and Lisa soon learn that Steve is not as he appears—Steve plays a series of pranks and practical jokes, including shaving the family cat, and places the blame on Bart! Bart and Lisa eventually catch Steve in the act, and Steve is sent home in disgrace.”

Option 2: Create a Character for a New TV Show or Movie

Invent a character for a new animated TV show or movie. This option is more challenging, because you’ll need to create the character’s look completely from scratch. Write a three- or four-sentence description of your character’s role in the new TV show or movie.

Here’s a sample description: “The Incredibly Strange Adventures of Sam the Wonder-Dog is an animated film about Sam, a border collie who performs in the circus with her beloved owner, Lou. Sam’s special talent is that she balances on the high wire. Sam is accidentally left behind when the circus leaves town. The film follows Sam’s adventures with the animals and people who help her find her way back to Lou and the circus.”

Step 2 - Create a Written Description & Conduct Research

Due Monday, September 18

You will complete a Character Description Worksheet for your character and research details for your character to make your character.

Once you’ve chosen your character, write a detailed description. Be sure to include information about the character’s personality (for example, his or her likes and dislikes) and backstory (for example, where he or she comes from), as well as physical characteristics, including appearance, movements, and aspects of  personality that might affect an animation.

Conduct research to learn details that will make your character believable. Character-related research is an important activity for many animators as they develop characters. Animators for the film Finding Nemo, for example, went scuba diving at coral reefs to see what the underwater world looked like. If your character is an animal, you might research online to find videos of that animal so that you can observe how it looks and how it moves. If you are creating a character for an existing TV show or movie, you can research the other characters in that world and the style in which they are drawn.

Adapted from: FOUNDATIONS IN VISUAL ARTS UNIT 5: CREATING CHARACTERS © Education Development Center, Inc. 2009

Step 3 - Illustrate your Character with Character Studies

   Due Friday, September 22

Draw character studies for your character, your character studies will need to include 3 turnaround model sheets, 1 page per model sheet in your sketch book. The model sheets are as follows…

  • Model Sheet 1 – Character Turnaround (front view, ¾ view, side view and back view). (Based on handout given in class.)
  • Model Sheet 2 4 action poses that are relevant to the character.
  • Model Sheet 36 facial expressions that are relevant to the character.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click  on the link to the left to see Sample Model Sheets of Goofy

 

 

Grading

  • Creativity and design of the character, you will be digitizing this character in Illustrator
  • All four model sheets representing the character features as explained above must be completed.
  • Do not color your model a sheet, shading is okay.
  • On Model Sheet 1 print neatly information requested on handout provided in class.
  • Scan all three model sheets and turn in to TurnIn folder for your class period.
    (LastNameF_ModelSheet1, LastNameF_ModelSheet2, LastNameF_ModelSheet3, LastNameF_ModelSheet4)

NOTE: You will use this same character in a storybook / graphic novel you will be writing.

Week 5 - September 25 - September 29

Monday - Begin Writing a Story

Due Wednesday, September 27

It's time to write a story for your character. Read the following information which provides tips/strategies for writing a good story. Your story needs to be a complete story, you can not leave a "cliffhanger" ending to your story, it must have a resolution!

You will write your story as you would in any other story, in paragraphs and tell a COMPLETE story.

A good story has a reason to be told; it is set up well at the beginning and flows nicely into a resolution. When developing your story it is important to remember that the reader, or viewer, may not know your character. If it is an original character it is important to familiarize the reader or viewer with the character so they become invested in wanting to hear your story. If you are using an established character you can jump write into the story.

Every story needs to have a beginning, middle and an end.  The beginning of the story can also be referred to as the set-up and should introduce the:

  • character’s goal or goals,
  • settings, and
  • situation or conflict.

The middle of the story should show the development of the story through a sequence of obstacles which will lead to the climax.

The end of the story is comprised of the climax and the resolution. The climax involves the final conflict that addresses the character’s goals. The resolution ties up any loose ends of the story ending the story quickly. It is difficult to keep the reader’s attention after the climax has occurred because the tension, which was developed during the middle of the story, disappears quickly.

Consider Simplifying Your Story

  • consider time, action, and place
  • reduce characters to the bare minimum needed to tell your story
  • keep settings to the absolute minimum needed to make your story work eliminate all sub-plots

When writing your story, make several timelines to track your story. One timeline will show what the readers will see in the story and should include what action needs to occur and where character development will go. A timeline should be made for each character so you know where their life has been and where it will be going. (Note: This will help you to write a more realistic story.)

 

Thursday & Friday- Outlining your Story to Prepare it for Illustrating

Begin by dividing a blank page into panels for your story. Using your timelines as a guide, fill in the panels with either descriptions or sketches of what action should be seen, dialogue that will be displayed in the panel, and camera angles that will be used. (Note: Try not to place too many words into a single panel.) This is called a storyboard, a series of pictures used to show a story in a sequence. Storyboards are used when making movies, cartoons, and picture books. A comic strip or comic book uses a storyboard approach to telling its story.

Writing your own comic book, illustrated story book or graphic novel will be a good way to learn the necessary skills to write an effective storyboard. The same basic elements used in composing a storyboard can be seen in panels of a comic book. One basic element is the camera angle, the way the panel’s layout is composed. The camera angle is used to change the composition of the panel to display a close-up, a medium-shot, a long-shot, a two-shot, an over-the-shoulder shot, and a birds-eye view, see the Table for explanations of each of these terms. Since there is no actual movement in a comic using different camera angles gives the illusion of action. In addition, using different camera angles can keep a panel fresh and inviting.

Type of Shot Description

  • Close-up - The subject of the panel takes up the whole frame.
  • Medium - shot Part of the subject is shown in more detail while giving the impression of the whole scene.
  • Long-shot - An entire scene is shown, the subject is shown in a setting
  • Two-shot - The panel displays two people.
  • Over-the-shoulder - Looking from behind a person at the subject.
  • Birds-eye view - The panel is shown from above.

Your story outline will need to have at least 15 panels (illustrations), how you choose to compile your story whether it be in storybook format, a graphic novel or a comic book is up to you.

You will need to write an outline for your story, this can either be done in your spiral or in Microsoft Word. Also, identify what type of format your story will be written in storybook, graphic novel, or comic book.

Your outline needs to have the following:

  • Panel #
  • Dialog
  • Type of Shot
  • Summary of Panel

Week 6 - October 2 - October 6

Draw your Story in Panels

Now you will illustrate your story from your outline, this week will be the only time provided in class to draw your story. You should/need to be working on this outside of class.

Decide what format you want to illustrate your story for example: graphic novel, comic book or illustrated storybook.

 

This is the final grade of the 1st 6 weeks and will be Due by the end of class Friday, October 6th.

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