ANIMATION

Three main things will be considered when evaluating a student’s design work:

 

Effort - visible in the work and/or demonstrated in class; spend quality time on your work!

Creativity - how original your work is

Following Directions - did you explore the assignment as given?

SUPPLY LIST FOR ANIMATION

 

 

• Drawing Sketch Pad

• 1 Subject Notebook

• 2-inch 3-ring binder

• 8GB Flash Drive

• Drawing Pencils

• Eraser

• Pencil Sharpener

• Fine Tip Sharpie

Class Syllabus|Rules

6th 6 Weeks

Technology Use

 

Students should have all devices on silent mode and put away when I am teaching. If you are doing independent work you may listen to music with one ear-bud in your ear.

 

GRADING POLICY

 

Student grades for this course will be calculated according to the following percentages:

  • 50% Major projects
  • 50% Small Projects / Practice Assignments
  • On time maximum credit: 100%
  • Late work maximum credit: 70% (10 points off per day late)

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

 

As a result of taking this class, you should be able to:

Utilize the tools of design, presentation, and animation.

Practice the creative and technical process of animation.

Develop systems of creative thinking that will aid in solving visual problems.

Explore how how ideas are generated in animation and how problems are resolved.

Understand and define successful animation.

Build an animation gradually using sketches and mockups.

Create model sheets.

Write storyboards

 

In addition to the comprehensive objectives, you should be able to:

Use Adobe Illustrator to create character drawings and an illustrated story.

Use Adobe Flash to create various types of animations.

Integrate the use of Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Flash together to create various types of animations.

Use Adobe Edge Animate to create interactive animations.

Use AutoDesk Maya and Mudbox to create and animate 3D characters.

 

How Do I Make Up Missing or Incomplete Work?

You are expected to keep up with lessons and projects in class. Keep track of course assignments and due dates at this website. Late or incomplete work can be turned in during the same six weeks for a reduced score of 10 points per day. If the work is late due to an excused absence, you will have one extra school day per day of excused absence to complete it without a reduction in grade.

Please let me know as soon as you have submitted a late assignment. Otherwise I will not know to look for it.

 

Open Lab - the lab is open at 8:00 am every morning for students to come in and work.

 

Design Room Rules

Refer to the Student Handbook for school-wide rules. We have design room rules too:

1. Don’t prevent me from teaching.

2. Don’t prevent others from learning.

3. Be safe.

4. Keep things clean.

 

What Do those 4 Rules Really Mean Day-to-Day?

Here are some examples to show you what I mean. These are examples. Use your common sense when interpreting these rules.

Don’t prevent me from teaching.

• Don’t speak while I am instructing the class.

• Raise your hand if you wish to speak, and wait for me to call on you.

• Don’t interrupt when I am giving personal attention to another student.

Don’t prevent others from learning.

• Don’t behave in a disruptive or distracting way.

• Don’t engage in lengthy off-topic conversations.

• Keep the volume of your voice down.

• No singing, rapping, or other disruptive noises.

Be safe.

• Don’t throw, toss, flick, or roll anything across the table, floor, or classroom.

• Don’t roll across the classroom in your chair.

• Use classroom materials in a safe manner.

• Don’t behave in any way that threatens harm to anyone or our equipment.

Keep things clean.

• Clean up after yourself so your station is ready for the next student.

• Return classroom materials to the proper storage place.

• Don’t eat messy things that can leave residue on the computers.

• Keep your language clean.

Professional Skills Grade

It is my job to help you develop positive work behaviors and personal qualities needed to be employable by demonstrating skills related to seeking employment , creating work samples and earning certifications. Each week you will earn a "professional skills grade" for your professional conduct in class by following the Design Room Rules and following the 4 Rules detailed above.

Week 1 - April 23 - April 27

Animate Practice Exams - The code you used in class to use for Adobe Illustrator should still work.

  • Log in to the GMETRIX website. (You use this website earlier in the year and should know your login credentials.)
  • Take each of the Animate CC 2015 Tests (1 & 2) in training mode and testing mode.
  • You will receive a grade for each Practice Test - a completion grade (formative) for doing it in training mode and the grade earning in testing mode (summative).
  • PRINT the Completed Screen turn into the tray for your class period when you are finished, these are GRADES!
    BE SURE YOUR NAME IS ON IT BEFORE PLACING IT IN THE TRAY.
  • You are authorized to take these practice tests at home if you want extra practice.

 

 

 

 

Certification testing will take place when you have completed the practice tests. Be sure you are registered on the Certiport website. When creating an account use your personal email NOT your school email account.

 

The Exam Group Code is 1982793.

Week 2 - April 30 - May 4

Complete Animate Practice Exams

  • Log in to the GMETRIX website. (You use this website earlier in the year and should know your login credentials.)
  • Take each of the Animate CC 2015 Tests (1 & 2) in training mode and testing mode.
  • You will receive a grade for each Practice Test - a completion grade (formative) for doing it in training mode and the grade earning in testing mode (summative).
  • PRINT the Completed Screen turn into the tray for your class period when you are finished, these are GRADES!
    BE SURE YOUR NAME IS ON IT BEFORE PLACING IT IN THE TRAY.
  • You are authorized to take these practice tests at home if you want extra practice.
  • NOTE: Test 1 is now considered LATE!

 

 

 

Begin certification testing when you have completed the practice tests. Be sure you are registered on the Certiport website. When creating an account use your personal email NOT your school email account.

 

The Exam Group Code is 1982793.

Week 3 - May 7 - May 11

If you still need to work on gmetrix please do so outside of class so you do not fall behind.

Let me know when you are done so I can update your grades. You may still attempt the ACA certification when you are ready.

 

Today, you will choose a concept for you final animation to be completed in Adobe Animate. Keep in mind the short amount of time left in class to complete this. This final animation is Due May 31st! (that's 18 classes)

You  will be stepping through the pipeline of a typical animated short can be divided into three stages: pre-production, production and post-production.

You will begin with the pre-production phase.

 

PHASE 1: Pre-Production

The first process in the animation pipeline, and also one of the most important, is pre-production. It begins with the main concepts which are initially turned into a full story, and then, once the story has been finalized, other things such as the script, shot sequence and camera angles are worked on. Some major components of pre-production are Story Boarding, Layouts, Model Sheets and Animatics.

Character Development

Character-related research is an important activity for many animators as they develop characters. Animators for the film Finding Nemo, for example, went scuba diving at coral reefs to see what the underwater world looked like. If your character is an animal, you might research online to find videos of that animal so that you can observe how it looks and how it moves.

Adapted from: FOUNDATIONS IN VISUAL ARTS UNIT 5: CREATING CHARACTERS © Education Development Center, Inc. 2009

Something to consider when developing your character.

Storyboarding / Story Development

The storyboard helps to finalize the development of the storyline, and is an essential stage of the animation process. It is made up of drawings in the form of a comic strip, and is used to both help visualize the animation and to communicate ideas clearly. It details the scene and changes in the animation, often accompanied by text notes describing things occurring within the scene itself, such as camera movements.

Not only can storyboards be especially useful when working in group environments (something quite common in the animation industry,) but they also provide a visual reminder of the original plan; something that can be referred back to throughout the production.

The story development process in feature animation is worlds apart from live-action script development. Animated film scripts were non-existent for the first 50 years. Stories were developed "in-house" in story meetings and were based on fairy tales, treatments and books. Sometimes, like in the case of DUMBO, an idea sparked a story session but that was the exception and not the rule. It wasn't until the late 80s that moguls started introducing a script into the pre-production process. Feature Animation was the first type of film to utilize the storyboard in the writing process. [http://thescriptblog.blogspot.com/2008/06/feature-animation-story-development.html]

Layouts/Scenes

Once the storyboards have been approved, they are sent to the layout department which then works closely with the director to design the locations and costumes. With this done they begin to stage the scenes, showing the various characters' positions throughout the course of each shot.

Model Sheets

Model sheets are precisely drawn groups of pictures that show all of the possible expressions that a character can make, and all of the many different poses that they could adopt. These sheets are created in order to both accurately maintain character detail and to keep the designs of the characters uniform while different animators are working on them across several shots.

Animatics

In order to give a better idea of the motion and timing of complex animation sequences, the pre-visualization department creates simplified mock-ups called "Animatics" shortly after the storyboarding process. These help the Director plan how they will go about staging the above sequences, as well as how visual effects will be integrated into the final shot.

In addition, this helps the story to be "flushed" out and to determine if any changes need to be made to the story, layout or characters before going any further.

Job Descriptions at Disney in Animation

Rough Sketches for Character Model Sheets

In your sketchbook, you should develop your character that you are going to create a model sheet of. These sketches should show investigation of the character, personality, actions, emotional responses, viewpoints, basic underlying forms and volumes.

  • Draw 7-10 actions (large and small)
  • Draw 7-10 emotions or expressions of your character

 

Adapted from: https://www.cteonline.org/curriculum/outline/advanced-animation-design-pbl-model/LPjxzi

 

Character Model Sheet

Taking the rough sketches from their sketch book students must layout in red/blue or graphite pencil 4 standard poses (front, side, 3/4 view, back), 5-7 various full figure actions, and 5 developed expressions. Once the pencil roughs are worked out, student(s) should show get approval from team members, once approved carefully ink and outline their drawings. The layout of the model sheet should be neat, and well composed, not cramped or crinkled.

Be sure to carefully plan placement of positions and be sure to include the following information on the sheets when applicable:

  • Title of project
  • Character Name
  • Title of model sheet (Standard Poses, Actions, Expressions)
  • Page number
  • Date created
  • Any codes for colors of character
  • Any special notes or instructions about the structure, dynamics, movement, appearance of the character that may be useful for other production members.

Assessment

High Quality Model Sheet "A": Student has included a wide range of expressions and actions. Character is developed and drawn consistently in terms of its volume, line quality, appeal, and proportions. Underlying volumes may or may not be visible but character has a clear sense of underlying volumes.

Medium Quality Model Sheet "B": Student has included some limited range of expressions and actions. Character is somewhat developed, but may be drawn inconsistently in terms of its volume, line quality, appeal, and proportions. Underlying volumes of character are inconsistent and perhaps difficult to discern.

Low Quality Model Sheet "C": Student has not developed much of a range of expressions and actions. Character is not very developed and lacks appeal.  Character is drawn inconsistently, is out of proportion, line quality is poorly developed. Character lacks any sense of underlying volumes.

  • Create a Folder in the TurnIn folder for your class period for your group, name it after your story.
  • Scan your Character Model Sheets and turn into your group folder. Name your files as follows: LastnameF_StandardPoses, LastnameF_Actions, LastnameF_Expressions.

 

Week 4 - May 14 - May 18

Now it's time to start working on your story. In animation the story is an important component. This was figured out early on in the development of animation as an art form and industry. Initially audiences were content and simply amazed by movement on the screen, and early animations were based on sight gags and slapstick humor. The novelty of the medium of animation wore off and it wasn't until animators like Walt Disney focused on the development of character and personality, and developing engaging stories that the medium really took off. Even today animation powerhouses like Pixar make sure that a good story comes first before putting lots of artistic and technical work, time, and money into a production.

Writing a Dynamic Premise for an Animation Production

You will now write the  premise for your animation, this is a short description or overview written to communicate and sell the animation story to others. The premise should be both descriptive and concise, providing a sense of the character, setting, and conflict, but not necessarily get into all the details, dialogue, and nuances of the story. The language should be exciting and dynamic, written in a way that would sound enthusiastic and convincing if and when read out loud.

You will work on this as a group, REMEMBER the fairy tale or animation you have chosen is a starting point for you, it provides the viewer the background already necessary to know your characters you will be writing/adapting the story to make it your own, make it original.

  • Your premise needs to be AT LEAST 500 words in length, the names of all group members and a title for your story.
  • Print a copy of your premise and turn it into the tray.
  • Save the file as Premise and the title of your  story.
  • Make a folder for your group in the folder for your class period in the TurnIn folder, if you have not already done so.
  • Put a copy of the file in the TurnIn folder for your class in your groups folder.

 

 Storyboarding your Animation

Now you are ready to start writing your script in storyboard form. Your storyboard will need to include sketches, dialog and descriptions that will help explain the action that will need to be animated. The storyboard sheets you will be using are located on the table under the mirror, use as many as you need to tell your story. Be sure to label the Panel No. and the Sequence No. (Scene No.).

 

Begin Animating

Start your Animate file as follows:

  • Create New --> ActionScript 3.0
  • Name your File as follows: LastnameF_FinalProject
  • OPTIONAL STEP: Import your scans into the Library (File --> Import --> Import to Library)
  • Create each of your animated characters as its own Movie Symbol - think of the skateboading apple you animated early, this will allow you to animated the specific movements of your character within the symbol and then move your symbol across the stage to add additional movement.

Week 5 - May 21 - May 25

  • Continue working on your animated scene.
  • You can come in during your lunch to work or before school.
  • DUE MAY 31st

 

Week 6 - May 28 - June 1

  • Continue working on your animated scene.
  • You can come in during your lunch to work or before school.
  • ALL WORK FOR THE 6TH 6 WEEKS IS DUE NO LATER THAN FRIDAY, JUNE 1ST
  • Turn in your FLA file and export your file to a movie format either a SWF or an MOV.

 

We will watch the animations on MONDAY, JUNE 4TH

FINAL EXAM

 

You will take your Final Exam on GMETRIX. Log in to your account choose GO and make the selections shown below. Remember to click FINISH or I will not see your grade.

 

 

 

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